September 19, 2019

Neighborhood Trees for 2020

MSRNA supports our neighborhood forest by offering low-cost, top-quality, best-fit-for-our-climate trees to our neighbors in Middle Shooks Run area. You can pay for your trees now and they will be delivered next April.

All trees are $85 each and come in a #7 Air-pruned-container. Cost includes one-year membership and free delivery. (If you’re already an MSRNA member, discount the cost by $15.) This is well below the prices of trees at local garden centers.

We have only a few trees of each species, so order early! If you’re interested in reserving a tree, contact info@msrna.org. You can pay for your trees using this button from PayPal. Let us know what trees you want or if you have questions: info@msrna.org.




Available species:

Redbud (Cercis canadensis) – This little tree which usually grows no taller than 30 feet bears showy pink flowers in very early spring flowers lasting for two to three weeks. The leaves also emerge with a reddish color giving way to a lustrous summer green and finally to a striking fall yellow. Even in winter this little tree is pleasant to behold with its arching limbs and rounded crown.

Turkish Filbert (Corylus columa)- Turkish Filbert is a medium sized shade tree grown for its its tidy, symmetrical shape. Viewed from a distance, its grows taller than wide, which makes it useful for narrow areas. Although the flowers are not that ornamental, the leaves are a lustrous dark green. Turkish filbert takes some time to establish a new root system after it is transplanted, but is very drought tolerant thereafter. Mature height: 30 to 45 ft. Mature spread: 20 to 25 ft. Colorado native: No

Kentucky Coffeetree (Gymnocladus dioicus) – Kentucky Coffeetree is a large tree with large, compound leaves. The canopy is broad and round when the tree is mature, making it a decent shade tree. Male trees have smaller 4-inch flowers, while female trees have larger, showier and more fragrant clusters of flowers – up to 12 inches long. The flowers transform into a brown bean-shaped pod that will persist into winter after all the leaves have fallen. In fall, the leaves turn bright yellow. The bark is brown and heavily textured with ridges and furrows. Kentucky coffeetree is a fabulous low-water, large shade tree for the Colorado Springs area. Flower color: yellow-green, bloom time: early summer. Mature height: 40 to 50 ft. Mature spread: 40 to 50 ft. Native to North America.

Royal Raindrops Crabapple (Malus Royal Raindrops sproutfree)  – Crabapples can be wonderful small trees for the Colorado Springs area. They bloom early in the season with gorgeous pink-red flowers. Purple leaves; flowers and fruit sparse. Once established, crabapple trees can be quite drought tolerant. Tree shape & size: upright, spreading, 15 ft height, 12 ft spread. Disease resistant.

American Hop Hornbeam (Ostrya Virginiana) – also commonly called ironwood, due to its extremely hard and dense wood. The tree’s leaves are dark green and sharply serrated, resembling birch leaves. This tree produces seed-bearing pods that resemble hops, hence its common name. It attracts small mammals and birds. Bark is gray-brown and flaky. Pyramidal shape when young becoming rounded with age. Mature height: 25-40 feet. Native to North America.

Bur Oak (Quercus macrocarpa) – Bur oak is a very large, stately, drought-tolerant shade tree. It is a slow-growing member of the white oak family with a broadly rounded crown at maturity. It has medium green, deeply lobed leaves that turn yellow, gold, and brown in the fall. The bark of the main trunk and branches is corky and deeply furrowed, while the twigs are almost winged with deep ridges of bark. Large (up to 1 1/2 inches), fringed acorns are produced in fall. Bur oak is more tolerant of our alkaline soils than many oaks, and very drought tolerant once established. It may retain some brown leaves during winter when young. It is an excellent choice for a large, long-lived, drought-tolerant shade tree. Mature height: 50 to 60 ft. Mature spread: 35 to 45 ft. Native to North America.

Glenleven Linden (Tilia cordata ‘Glenleven’) – Linden trees are an excellent choice for yards in Colorado. A valuable landscape tree, lindens are prized for their pyramical shape, and their deep green, heart-shaped leaves that turn an attractive, golden yellow in fall. Few insect problems, tolerate our sub-zero winter temperatures and our alkaline soils. Blooming in July, their flowers are fragrant, attract bees, and can be used as a tea. Mature height: 40 feet. Native to North America.